History

RSS

The Springpole has been used by professional dog trainers for over a hundred years. 

  

The benefits of a dog tugging on something overhead and the results that are produced is well documented.  

A springpole is technically any stretchy device that is hung and tugged on from below by a dog. 

If your dog uses a springpole regularly then you will see an increase in strength and muscle.  

Just like doing pull ups over and over again will make a human stronger, the same is true in dogs.

The first springpoles were just a bite target (cotton rope or linen rag) attached to a long springy tree branch or a sapling. 

The name came from the similarity to a “springpole lathe” a wood working tool that has been used since at least the viking age. 

Springpoles are actually very simple to make, anyone can assemble an effective springpole from supplies found at the hardware store. 

The concept is so simple that most people do just that and can have very good results but Tugmutt springpoles have been designed to get the very best results in the safest and most effective way possible.

There are a lot of misconceptions about springpoles especially what they are used for and the results they produce. 

Most of the misunderstanding comes from the fact that up until recently they were used exclusively by dog fighters, so unfortunately a lot of people now associate springpoles with dog fighting.

The fact is dog fighters did invent and continue to use springpoles but the reason why they use them is misunderstood.  

The reason dog fighters use them is clear, they are simply the best way to strengthen and condition a dog. 

They do not use them to promote aggression or dominance.

Experts now agree that tugging has no negative effects towards dominance and aggression, in fact the opposite seems to be true (Rooney & Brandshaw, 2003)

Dogs have a deep instinct to bite and tug, it comes from when they had to work together as a pack to take down large prey.

  Playing tug of war and working the springpole is seen by your dog as a team effort, not a war or game they are trying to win.

  

Previous Post Next Post

  • Tim Maggs