Setup

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Choosing the right springpole and setting it up correctly is critical for success! 

There are 2 basic types of springpole and they each focus on a different type of workout.

  

The first type of springpole setup is the Bite and Hang.

This type of setup should have a short and stiff spring that doesn't stretch too much.  This will allow your dog to jump, bite and hang with all 4 legs off the ground.  

Our Bungee Spring XL are used most often for this type of setup but you don't even need a spring at all, just a bite target hanging at the right height will work also.  

A bite and hang springpole is a great plyometric workout and used to increase bite strength and endurance.  

Springpole sport competitions focus on how long a dog can stay gripped and freely hanging on the bite target, so this is the type of springpole to use if you plan on competing in this sport.

Bite and Hang Springpoles are great for grip and endurance but the best feature of this type of springpole is the plyometric aspect of it.  

This is the simple act of jumping for the bite target over and over again.  

There is so much effort expended and muscle to be gained from jumping that it can be a really valuable condition tool.

To get the most out of this type of springpole it's important to be able to lower and raise the minimum height of the bite target.  

They gain so much from jumping and you want to force them to jump as high as they can every time.

When setting up a Bite and Hang springpole you want to start them off low and gradually raise the height until they really have to try to reach it.  

This will greatly increase the effectiveness of the workout.

Motivation is Key!

Jumping as high as possible is the key to gains.  

Do not lower the bite target once they start to get tired, this will negatively impact motivation.  

Instead it is better to end the session and let them have possession of the bite target for a quick reward and then take it away until next time.

The Bite and Hang setup is the most common type of springpole you see people using, mainly because it looks cool to have your dog swinging around but it is not the most effective for building muscle.  

 

The second type of springpole is the Bite and Tug.

This is the best type of springpole for building muscle.  

Just like a human builds more muscle doing a proper chin up vs simply hanging and holding on with extended arms, the same is true for dogs.

This type of setup should have a longer spring and a greater stretch ratio.  

Most dogs need about about 12"-18"of stretch to do a full body tug.  

These full body tugs are essential for maximizing gains.

The Tugmutt Bungee Spring and Springpole are the best option for this type of setup.  

They are specifically designed with the proper length and amount of stretch to maximize gains.  

Setting the bite target at the appropriate height is again the most important aspect for success.  

The bite target should hang at a level so when they are gripping it they have both front paws off the ground with their back paws firmly on the ground.  

Their back paws should have enough weight on them for good traction and their front paws should almost touch the ground when they complete a full body tug.

Motivation is key!

The most effective use of this setup is to encourage a full body tug over and over and over again.  

TugMutt Springpole products make achieving this goal simple and easy.   

Achieving a controlled and effective springpole workout with this setup is best done by reinforcing a tug for reward system.  

Dogs view tugging and working the springpole as a group activity like taking down large prey animals together.  

You can use this to your advantage by reinforcing that the goal of the exercise is to tug on the springpole until the bite target comes down.  

The velcro strap is the key to this strategy, it makes it easy to release the bite target, which reinforces them to tug as hard and as long as they can.

Learn more in the next section about how to effectively use a TugMutt Springpole

 

 

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  • Tim Maggs